Ashley Shreves

Bio

After an emergency medicine residency at St. Luke’s-Roosevelt in New York City, Ashley Shreves developed an interest in end-of-life cases and pursued a fellowship in palliative medicine at Mt. Sinai. She worked clinically in both palliative care and EM for the 3 years following fellowship. She has recently relocated to New Orleans where she will soon begin working in the ED at Ochsner Medical Center.


EM Year in Review

We'll be doing a rapid cruise through the most exciting and practice-changing EM studies from the past year.
It has been exciting and surprising year in the EM literature. We’ll be hitting all the highlights and letting you know what’s hot and what’s not. Topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, abscess management, medications for renal colic, imaging for subarachnoid, new anticoagulant reversal agents, use of opiates, and the diagnosis of PE.

Why we need palliative care everywhere

The world outside our hospital walls is changing. The population ages and becomes more complex. Medicine that helps patients live longer but not necessarily better is not sustainable. Palliative care is the solution for much of what ails us and our patients.

As our population ages, the complexity of patients seeking care in the emergency department will increase dramatically. Chronic and terminal diseases will be ever-present but increasingly in patients also negotiating challenges like functional and cognitive decline. While their needs are different, in many hospitals, it is business as usual. A highly skilled and well-intentioned staff stands ready to deploy a limitless supply of diagnostic and therapeutic options designed to help patients live longer, not necessarily better.

Relying on default pathways that prioritize life-prolongation at the mercy of comfort and dignity has already left many patients and doctors feeling unsatisfied, while wasting precious healthcare resources. The future should not be more of the same.

If a new and better clinical road is to be paved in the future, it will be with the aid of palliative care, a specialty, philosophy and movement in medicine. Getting patients better access to palliative care should be a priority for our specialty. For some, this will mean partnering with existing palliative care specialists and hospices. Unfortunately, for most of us, the palliative care workforce will never be able to match the increasing demand created by our patients. This means that we must all do the hard, but incredibly rewarding work of learning a basic palliative care skillset. No pressure but the future of healthcare depends on it!


As our population ages, the complexity of patients seeking care in the emergency department will increase dramatically. Chronic and terminal diseases will be ever-present but increasingly in patients also negotiating challenges like functional and cognitive decline. While their needs are different, in many hospitals, it is business as usual. A highly skilled and well-intentioned staff stands ready to deploy a limitless supply of diagnostic and therapeutic options designed to help patients live longer, not necessarily better.

Relying on default pathways that prioritize life-prolongation at the mercy of comfort and dignity has already left many patients and doctors feeling unsatisfied, while wasting precious healthcare resources. The future should not be more of the same.

If a new and better clinical road is to be paved in the future, it will be with the aid of palliative care, a specialty, philosophy and movement in medicine. Getting patients better access to palliative care should be a priority for our specialty. For some, this will mean partnering with existing palliative care specialists and hospices. Unfortunately, for most of us, the palliative care workforce will never be able to match the increasing demand created by our patients. This means that we must all do the hard, but incredibly rewarding work of learning a basic palliative care skillset. No pressure but the future of healthcare depends on it!



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