Deirdre Murphy

Bio

I am an intensivist in Melbourne. I am passionate about echocardiography and ultrasound in critical care. Mechanical circulatory support is also a major interest and provides me with plenty of opportunities for practising my echo skills. I enjoy teaching and have been involved in running courses on TOE, TTE and ultrasound, haemodynamics and ECMO. Outside of work I spend most of time trying to keep up with my kids who are 9 and 11. Their latest obsession is mountain -biking.


Bad Blood

Non-malignant acquired haematological disorders in critical care - DIC, TTP, HUS and other MAHAs, ADAMST13, HIT and NETosis,
Critically ill patients frequently have activation of inflammatory and clotting pathways. These are likely adaptive responses in the human. When they run riot or the fine balance between pro- and anti-inflammatory states is shifted however there can be significant morbidity and mortality. This acronym-busting talk will focus on some acquired haematological disorders in critically ill patients. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) is a clinical and laboratory diagnosis that affects about 1% of hospitalised patients. At the most severe end it is associated with bleeding and/or thrombotic complications. Disorders such as thrombotic thrombocytopenia purpura (TTP) and other forms of micro-angiopathic hemolytic anemia (MAHA) will also be described including the role of ADAMST13. HIT is an uncommon but important conditions which is difficult to diagnose in a critically ill patient. An approach to HIT is discussed. Have you always wondered about NETs (neutrophil extracellular traps) and their importance? If so this whistle-stop tour of non-malignant hematology in the ICU is for you!

Cardiac Surgery - What Can Go Wrong?

Murphy's Law of Cardiac Surgery dictates that what can go wrong, will go wrong at the worst possible moment... Find out how to beat Murphy.

Cardiac surgery can vary from being routine elective surgery to time-critical emergency surgery. The term encompasses a broad range of procedures carried out on patients from neonates to nonagenarians. In the 63 years since the first open heart surgery was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass enormous advances have been made in the field such that an average person presenting for coronary bypass grafting in 2016 can expect a very low chance of peri-operative morbidity or mortality. When things go wrong however they can go badly wrong and at the worst possible moment (see Murphy’s Law). This talk focuses on describing common complications encountered in the postoperative period, with a focus on anticipation, prevention and planning for rapid recognition and successful management of potentially life threatening complications.


Cardiac surgery can vary from being routine elective surgery to time-critical emergency surgery. The term encompasses a broad range of procedures carried out on patients from neonates to nonagenarians. In the 63 years since the first open heart surgery was performed using cardiopulmonary bypass enormous advances have been made in the field such that an average person presenting for coronary bypass grafting in 2016 can expect a very low chance of peri-operative morbidity or mortality. When things go wrong however they can go badly wrong and at the worst possible moment (see Murphy’s Law). This talk focuses on describing common complications encountered in the postoperative period, with a focus on anticipation, prevention and planning for rapid recognition and successful management of potentially life threatening complications.



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