Karin Amrein

Bio

Karin Amrein is Associate Professor and Consultant in Internal Medicine/Endocrinology in Graz, Austria. Her medical number one hobby is intensive care medicine. Although Karin has no interest in cells or rodents, she became passionate about research when she realized that it could be purely patient-centered. She is a believer of simple things that will improve critical care greatly, such as vitamin D for mortality reduction (VITdAL-ICU, JAMA September 2014), earplugs for delirium prevention and active empowerment of patients and their relatives to improve outcomes.
Karin has 2 funny smart girls aged 2 and 4, so life never becomes boring and the laundry is never done (and science neither).


Bone after ICU

ICU survivors fracture; a bone-derived hormone predicts ICU survival, bisphosphonates may improve ICU outcomes
Show me an intensivist that cares about bone! I do. Critical illness is detrimental to bone health for various reasons – profound vitamin D deficiency, extreme immobilisation, inflammation, excessive cytokine levels, malnutrition, endocrine dysfunction and medication all may lead to accelerated bone turnover and rapid bone loss. Today, many ICU patients are elderly, and therefore at substantial fracture risk even before critical illness. As an example, one year after a hip fragility fracture, 50 % of patients are either dead or independent. Bone health is therefore very important for morbidity and mortality of ICU survivors, adding up to the long-term sequelae after severe illness. Generally, osteoporosis remains underdiagnosed and therefore undertreated. On the other hand, recent evidence suggests that osteoporotic patients previously treated with a bisphosphonate may have a survival benefit compared to other patients. Furthermore, several publications in the last years showed that FGF-23, a phosphaturic, bone-derived hormone predicts outcome in the acute setting very accurately. Overall, the link between critical illness and bone is strong in both directions and will be discussed in this talk.

Critical Care: No place for a woman?

Women in medicine, in academia, in the ICU

Ah, but you don’t look like a professor! A recent statement from a (female) patient says it all, doesn’t it?

Since the first women were admitted to medical schools – quite a while ago in most countries, the participation of women in clinical and academic medicine has increased steadily. Overall, women represent the majority of health care workers and also medical students in most countries of the world today. SMACC audience is almost 50% female.
However, only few women make it to the top, and with each step up the career ladder, the proportion of women decreases substantially, a phenomenon called the “glass ceiling” or the „leaky pipeline“. This is particularly true for some medical specialties such as critical care or trauma surgery, as opposed to specialties like endocrinology, pediatrics or gynecology. Although often subtle, gender discrimination against women continues to be a problem – for instance, it has been shown that a ficticious student named “John” would receive a higher salary and find a mentor easier than “Jennifer”. A manuscript written by “John” is judged more favourably than one that is authored by “Joan”, and female grant applicants with the same scientific productivity are given substantially lower scores than male applicants by reviewers (men and women). Sheryl Sandberg’s statements are as true in clinical and academic medicine as in other areas.
This talk will definitely raise your awareness for the topic.


Ah, but you don’t look like a professor! A recent statement from a (female) patient says it all, doesn’t it?

Since the first women were admitted to medical schools – quite a while ago in most countries, the participation of women in clinical and academic medicine has increased steadily. Overall, women represent the majority of health care workers and also medical students in most countries of the world today. SMACC audience is almost 50% female.
However, only few women make it to the top, and with each step up the career ladder, the proportion of women decreases substantially, a phenomenon called the “glass ceiling” or the „leaky pipeline“. This is particularly true for some medical specialties such as critical care or trauma surgery, as opposed to specialties like endocrinology, pediatrics or gynecology. Although often subtle, gender discrimination against women continues to be a problem – for instance, it has been shown that a ficticious student named “John” would receive a higher salary and find a mentor easier than “Jennifer”. A manuscript written by “John” is judged more favourably than one that is authored by “Joan”, and female grant applicants with the same scientific productivity are given substantially lower scores than male applicants by reviewers (men and women). Sheryl Sandberg’s statements are as true in clinical and academic medicine as in other areas.
This talk will definitely raise your awareness for the topic.



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