Paul Young

Bio

Paul Young is an Intensive Care Specialist at Wellington Hospital, New Zealand, and the Director of the Intensive Care Research Programme at the Medical Research Institute of New Zealand. He is the New Zealand regional representative on the Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Society Clinical Trials Group (ANZICS CTG). He has more than 70 publications in peer-reviewed journals including recent publications in the New England Journal of Medicine and the Journal of the American Medical Association. He is currently involved in research collaborations with investigators in the Australia, New Zealand, United Kingdom, Ireland, Europe, Brazil, and North America. He has current research grants totalling >$20M. He prefers kite surfing to working, tweets as @DogICUma, and aspires to one day have more twitter followers than Simon Finfer.


The magic of remote ischaemic preconditioning

All you need to know about the promise and current reality of remote ischaemic preconditioning for clinical practice
2016 is the 30th anniversary of ischaemic preconditioning. Remote ischaemic preconditioning is the magical offspring of ischaemic preconditioning and refers to the phenomenon whereby brief periods of ischaemia in one organ can protect other organs from subsequent prolonged ischaemic insults. In theory, remote ischaemic preconditioning can be induced by temporarily interrupting the blood supply to an extremity using a blood pressure cuff. In experimental models this technique is effective in reducing ischaemia / reperfusion injury when applied after ischaemia but before reperfusion. As a result the technique has a wide range of potential clinical implications including: 1. Heart surgery with cardiopulmonary bypass 2. Planned percutaneous coronary interventions 3. Acute myocardial infarction 4. CBA being treated with lysis or clot retrieval 5. Carotid endarterectomy surgery 6. Hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy 7. Organ transplantation 8. abdominal aortic aneurysm surgery While this technique is not yet ready for clinical application, it remains an exciting potential therapeutic modality for the future.

ICU year in review

The top 10 ICU trials of 2015/16

Flavia Machado and Paul Young present the top 10 ICU trials of the recent past SMACC style.  Their list of trials includes a number that challenge dogma and establish interesting new lines of scientific enquiry.  In addition, they also include all the recent clinical trials that should change your practice.  If you want to know what’s new in critical care then this is the talk for you.


Flavia Machado and Paul Young present the top 10 ICU trials of the recent past SMACC style.  Their list of trials includes a number that challenge dogma and establish interesting new lines of scientific enquiry.  In addition, they also include all the recent clinical trials that should change your practice.  If you want to know what’s new in critical care then this is the talk for you.



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