Peter Brindley

Bio

Peter is one lucky bugger. He has a glorious family, a job where he can help others, job-security in uncertain times, and friends who make him laugh till beer comes through his nose. He is, however, a work in progress!


Burnout: A crisis of faith

This talk covers why its normal to burnout (so let's talk honestly about it), and (most importantly) offers practical strategies and personal cautionary tales.
You owe it to yourself (and to your patients) to learn about burnout and resilience in healthcare workers. This talk aims to be brutally honest, occasional humorous, and quite personal about the speaker’s experience and what he learnt along the way. Burnout is shockingly common. Burnout is also bloody important when it comes to our productivity, empathy, culture, and even our outcomes. Fortunately there are internal and external strategies. This talk hopes to address them head-on, and without the usual BS. After all, you can’t do well unless you are well.

RCTs are the Basis of Good Clinical Practice - CON

The Clinical Trial needs to be put on trial. This talk makes a valiant effort (though probably futile) against the obsession with RCTs as the only meaningful medical truth. Its time to get back (pronto) to the bedside, doctor!

This speaker is pretty certain he is going to lose…but he’s going to go down fighting. He will argue against the mighty Dr John Myberg (whom, incidentally, he admires mightily). RCTs do certainly matter, but clinical judgment and prompt bedside attention matters far more. Moreover, RCTs so often fail to address the questions that really matter. RCTs also commonly fail to improve quality, effectiveness, safety, and reliability in modern complex acute medical care. A vote against the blinkered focus on RCTs is a vote for better (not biased) patient care. Myberg and his myopics must be defeated…come join me!


This speaker is pretty certain he is going to lose…but he’s going to go down fighting. He will argue against the mighty Dr John Myberg (whom, incidentally, he admires mightily). RCTs do certainly matter, but clinical judgment and prompt bedside attention matters far more. Moreover, RCTs so often fail to address the questions that really matter. RCTs also commonly fail to improve quality, effectiveness, safety, and reliability in modern complex acute medical care. A vote against the blinkered focus on RCTs is a vote for better (not biased) patient care. Myberg and his myopics must be defeated…come join me!



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