Ryan Radecki

Bio

Ryan Radecki practices Emergency Medicine and Clinical Informatics in Portland, Oregon. He blogs at Emergency Medicine Literature of Note and publishes a diverse set of content on a range of issues – but is happiest when angrily ranting regarding distortions of evidence brought about by conflicts of interest. He is passionate about knowledge translation, quality improvement, resource utilization, and patient-centered care. His core clinical practice ethos can be summarized simply: if you can walk, and you can eat, you can go home.


EM Year in Review

Don't have time to keep up with every new publication? We'll take you on a whirlwind tour of the highest impact articles.
There are nearly 100 billion stars in the Milky Way – and almost that many articles published every year. Luckily for you, we read them all – or, at least, the ones in the domain of Emergency Medicine. Catch up with where the new literature is leading you, leading you astray, or just plain bonkers. Sit back and let us inspire you to take your own deep dive into all the great foundational science. We’ll swing through new stroke treatments, the ketamine blow-dart, the best medications for reanimating the dead, and many more!

Stroke Emergency! Don't Have a Stroke ....

Is time really brain? Does tPA have a future? Is the medieval era of stroke finally ending, or will it get worse before it gets better?

It’s been two decades since NINDS and MAST and ECASS and the other clot-busting lore cluttering up your brain. Have we learned anything in the interim? Are we using tPA more safely, more appropriately – or just more? And, what now, of endovascular therapy, CT perfusion, and patient-level predictive modeling – are you ready for the next decade of evolution in stroke care?

In this talk, we’ll go into the most recent trial evidence relating to saving neurons, and whether we should be suspicious or celebratory of their outcomes. On one hand, we have clinicians putting the low-tech non-contrast CT in a mobile stroke unit to treat more patients, while other clinicians are using rapid MRI and CT perfusion to precisely target treatment. We’ve also seen endovascular treatment finally hit prime-time after years of false starts, and systems of stroke care re-organized around its delivery. The pace of practice change – and the reliability of the evidence – is enough to give you a stroke!

Finally, we’ll look at the clinical trials underway, which may produce zero, subtle, or huge changes in practice. At the minimum, we’ll at least get a handful of new acronyms to file away.


It’s been two decades since NINDS and MAST and ECASS and the other clot-busting lore cluttering up your brain. Have we learned anything in the interim? Are we using tPA more safely, more appropriately – or just more? And, what now, of endovascular therapy, CT perfusion, and patient-level predictive modeling – are you ready for the next decade of evolution in stroke care?

In this talk, we’ll go into the most recent trial evidence relating to saving neurons, and whether we should be suspicious or celebratory of their outcomes. On one hand, we have clinicians putting the low-tech non-contrast CT in a mobile stroke unit to treat more patients, while other clinicians are using rapid MRI and CT perfusion to precisely target treatment. We’ve also seen endovascular treatment finally hit prime-time after years of false starts, and systems of stroke care re-organized around its delivery. The pace of practice change – and the reliability of the evidence – is enough to give you a stroke!

Finally, we’ll look at the clinical trials underway, which may produce zero, subtle, or huge changes in practice. At the minimum, we’ll at least get a handful of new acronyms to file away.



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