Bio

Proudly South African, Ross was born and educated at the continent’s tip in Cape Town. His professional fields of interest have centred upon acute and critical care, trauma, anaesthesia, aeromedical, emergency and wilderness medicine. He is a former doctor and overwintering Expedition Leader for the South African National Antarctic Expedition, and has worked extensively as an expedition doctor. After shifting his predominant focus to anaesthesia, he now enjoys the challenges as the inaugural Specialist Fellow in Airway and Thoracic Anaesthesia and Airway Lead for at the University of Cape Town. He is a long-serving member of the mountain rescue team and flight doctor for the Red Cross Air Mercy Service. Ross’s clinical and research interests include all facets of airway management, aeromedical care, remote and expedition medicine, point-of-care investigation, and thermoregulation. He is a keen course director, instructor, speaker and #FOAM enthusiast with numerous publications. When not providing care in the hospital or abroad, Ross is usually to be found in the wilds, committing random acts of aviation and/or adventure.


Confined Space Airway Management

Locations, challenges, options, techniques and evidence behind managing airways in confined spaces and austere places.
Airway management in confined spaces conjures up images of intubating entrapped victims of motor vehicle crashes, but these challenges can be found from the bottom of caves and crevasses, inside road and air ambulances, during natural and man-made disasters and even in multiple areas of the hospital, such as cath labs and hybrid theatres. In this presentation, Ross addresses the locations and difficulties which can be anticipated, and then discusses the options, techniques and evidence available for managing airways in constrained places. Learning to cope (and then excel) in abnormal fashions and positions makes us better at managing airways in both emergency and routine situations. Ice-pick, BIADs, transillumination, inverted, tomahawk, reversed, blind, digital…if these words excite you, you need to come learn how getting into tight places will teach you how to get out of tight spots.

Going Wild: Lessons from Wilderness Medicine

Practical and pragmatic lessons from wilderness and extreme environments that can make us better critical care practitioners.

Wilderness and expedition medicine is the epitome of practical, pragmatic, minimalist and thoughtful care. Austere and extreme environments require special knowledge, critical thinking, innovative practice and sometimes cunning improvisation. Diagnosis in the wilderness relies heavily on clinical examination skills, monitoring and special investigations are very limited, and treatment options are determined by the breadth and depth of the individual practitioner’s hands-on skills. The implications of extreme environments – high pressures and altitude, frigid and sweltering temperatures, hypoxia and high-intensity endurance exercise – can provide us with great insight into the physiology of humans responding and adapting to critical illness. In this presentation, Ross shares trials and tribulations and draws on experiences from wilderness rescue, and expeditions around the world, which provide lessons for wilderness medics. Many of these lessons can be translated to insights into practicing better acute and critical care medicine in our day-to-day settings.


Wilderness and expedition medicine is the epitome of practical, pragmatic, minimalist and thoughtful care. Austere and extreme environments require special knowledge, critical thinking, innovative practice and sometimes cunning improvisation. Diagnosis in the wilderness relies heavily on clinical examination skills, monitoring and special investigations are very limited, and treatment options are determined by the breadth and depth of the individual practitioner’s hands-on skills. The implications of extreme environments – high pressures and altitude, frigid and sweltering temperatures, hypoxia and high-intensity endurance exercise – can provide us with great insight into the physiology of humans responding and adapting to critical illness. In this presentation, Ross shares trials and tribulations and draws on experiences from wilderness rescue, and expeditions around the world, which provide lessons for wilderness medics. Many of these lessons can be translated to insights into practicing better acute and critical care medicine in our day-to-day settings.



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